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Video
WSFTE: Working Group on Public Policies

In April 2019, the WSFTE 2019 convergence meeting was held in the city of Barcelona. This meeting allowed more than 300 people from 46 countries, coming from different movements, to meet: Feminist Economies, Agroecology and Food Sovereignty, Social and Solidarity Economy and Common Goods or Procomún, as well as the transversal axes Public Policies (PP) and Training met to appreciate our diversity, detect our complicities and weave networks. The “Public Policies” group meets every month to exchange and analyse the importance and contribution of transformative economies in the different territories. The group drafted its objectives and decided to create a form to collect public policies in the different countries.

This form is the result of the collective process of the different actors of the transformative economies. It will be used to :

  1. Collect public policies or local initiatives that constitute an alternative to the current context because of the impact of Covid-19
  2. Carry out a study on the different experiences of transformative economies in the participation of civil society in the co-construction of public policies. This theme is divided into three areas: good practices, context and the capacity of institutions to develop policies.
  3. Draft an analytical note to be presented at the 2020 WSFTE
  4. Organise activities in the framework of the WSFTE 2020 to promote good practices.
  5. Share these results in other international spaces such as the GSEF 2020 to be held from 21 to 23 October.

The form is accessible from socioeco.org (here) and once completed will be integrated into the existing mapping on Public Policies, a mapping that allows selecting policies according to their scope (e.g. regional), the type of PP (e.g. co-production of PP), and its thematic (e.g. PP related to food).

Thank you for sharing any good practices that you consider important. Deadline: Friday, May 29, 2020. If you have a question about the form or the Public Policy group of the WSFTE, please contact Xavi Rubio at xrubio@bcn.cat.

Covid-19: Synthesis of measures for SSE actors
RTES

Local authorities are strongly mobilized to ensure the continuity of public services, to support the many solidarity-based citizen initiatives, but also to support SSE actors. Find some measures taken by the members of the RTES in support of SSE actors. Find also our summary of government measures, as well as initiatives taken by the SSE actor networks and local authority networks.

An address to inform us about your initiatives: animation@rtes.fr

List of :

  • Governmental measures
  • Measures by local and regional authorities
  • Mobilization of SSE networks

See all measures here (in French).

From RTES, France

A Green Deal for Europe ?

A new pact is needed to ensure that citizens, in all their diversity, national, regional and local authorities, civil society and business work hand in hand with the EU institutions and advisory bodies.
The intention is to become the first carbon-neutral continent by 2050.
The declaration of intent is commendable. However, when looking at the proposals set out in the Green Deal for Europe, by the European Commission, one remains perplexed by the lack of mention of a paradigm shift in the economy. It talks about 50 measures focused on economic planning to take into account the threat of climate change and their variations according to 7 areas of action

  1. Clean, carbon-free energy.
  2. A sustainable industry.
  3. A cleaner construction and renovation sector.
  4. Sustainable mobility: The promotion of more sustainable means of transport (e.g. Accompanied combined transport).
  5. Preserved or restored biodiversity.
  6. Ensuring a more sustainable food chain from agriculture to consumption with the Farm to Fork (F2F) project.
  7. Elimination of pollution
  8. Mobilising industry for a clean and circular economy

Frans Timmermans (photo), Vice-President of the Commission responsible for the Green Pact presented it to MEPs, saying that “it will take investments of €260-300 billion per year – public and especially private – to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050”, i.e. no less than 25% of the EU budget and 1.5% of the Union’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

Nowhere is there any reference to the role of the SSE, as underlined by Pour la Solidarité in a document issued in February (in French). Once again, the contribution of the solidarity economy to ecological transition and social justice is overlooked because, although citizens are included in certain chapters among those who must participate in this “colossal” effort (sic), nowhere is it mentioned that specific attention and support will be given to the companies and associations that are already implementing on the ground the pious wishes set out in this pact. Mention is made of the circular economy, but nothing is said about the existing forms that already meet the specifications proposed by the Green Pact.

Whether clean energy (such as the one of energy coops like Enercoop), sustainable industry (cooperatives, including those that save jobs by recovering the work tool thanks to employees who join forces), construction (ecological housing), mobility (SSE is at the forefront of promoting soft mobility), preservation of biodiversity (fight against major projects that are useless for saving biotopes), CSAs and AMAPs for short food circuits, waste disposal, etc., the Green Pact does not mention the circular economy, but nothing about the existing forms that already meet the specifications proposed by the Green Pact. It is these initiatives that the EU should better support by increasing the share of the ESF and ERDF allocated to the solidarity economy and not only to the social economy, which is not the poor relation in this area. It is the dynamics of innovation that should be encouraged in all areas involved in the transition.

The Pact mentions education and training. The Commission will develop a European framework of competences to contribute to the development and assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes relating to climate change and sustainable development.
RIPESS and its members are currently carrying out three training projects to invite SSE in initial training or that of elected representatives after having noted through a survey in the participating countries its quasi absence in training programmes. Can we expect from this new Pact a favourable reception of this work, whose recommendations we will put forward?

Subsidies on fossil fuels should be stopped. This is a good point. Its implementation is, moreover, a prerequisite for any policy to combat the damage caused by their use. It is difficult to see, however, how the Commission is going to succeed in imposing it, even if it is announced that funding is planned to support countries dependent on coal, for example. On the other hand, the citizens’ alliance can precipitate this movement, just as the consumers’ alliance for organic farming has done.
It is the role of a network to relay from the field to the institutions and vice versa the data essential to the orientation of a policy that makes sense for the evolution of society.

The Climate Pact will build on the series of dialogues with citizens and citizens’ assemblies that are underway across the EU, as well as the social dialogue committees.
The Aarhus Regulation should be revised to improve access to administrative and judicial review at EU level for citizens and NGOs who have doubts about the legality of decisions affecting the environment.
Available platforms can be used to simplify legislation and identify problematic cases.

While underlining the absence of any mention of SSE, one cannot question in advance the will to move European policy towards a decarbonised economy, but one must be vigilant to ensure that the windfall does not fall into the hands of large groups who will claim to “green” their methods when they use this funding to strengthen their supremacy at the expense of initiatives that are truly concerned with preserving the planet and social justice. It is time for Europe to encourage the multiplication of development adapted to local realities, supported by democratic assemblies where elected representatives and citizens consult and agree. The solidarity-based economy can testify to the relevance of these approaches, which succeed despite budgetary constraints and could give greater results if these obstacles were removed.

By Josette Combes

Local elections in France: citizens get involved.

In France for municipal elections, citizens are trying to thwart the old party system, which they no longer recognize as legitimate and too far removed from the social and ecological emergencies that concern them.

On the initiative of a few at the outset, they are creating alternative lists that no longer bring together the usual nomination candidates but citizens who come together on a project developed through consultations and meetings. In the end, the democratic exercise leads to the accession of a sufficient number of people to validate a list.

The website of the collective Action commune thus lists 157 participatory lists, “one third in villages of less than 2,000 inhabitants, one third in municipalities of 2,000 to 100,000 inhabitants, and one third in cities of more than 100,000 inhabitants”, says Thomas Simon, coordinator of the group, whose mission is to “accompany those who want to engage in citizen participation” (Reporterre 8 January 2020). An interactive map of these lists can be found on the Action commune website.

If these lists are not guaranteed to win the elections, they are an electric shock to the parties. They question the undemocratic methods of governing, by challenging the habits of verticality where the leader decides and surrounds himself with people who are committed to his cause. They highlight themes that the parties feel obliged to include in their programmes.

In addition, several associations have drafted proposals that they circulate in their networks for their members to take up and transmit to their elected officials.

Thus, the Collectif de la Transition citoyenne (Citizen Transition Collective) has drawn up a Pact for Transition inviting local networks to ask candidates to commit to at least 10 of the 32 proposals and to accompany / verify their implementation in the territories. The central objective of these proposals is to respond to the climate emergency and to repair social injustice.

The RTES (Réseau des Territoires pour l’Economie Solidaire) has published a municipal kit’ess containing about twenty sheets to support the initiative of municipalities towards more SSE in their local policy.

The UFISC (Union Fédérale d’Intervention des Structures Culturelles) proposes to the candidates and all those committed to their territories, arts and culture, 3 commitments declined through 20 concrete proposals (…) for a policy of cultural diversity based on cultural rights and a democratic and solidarity organisation.

The MES published : Elections Municipales. 12 questions.

Reporterre has also published its illustrated list of recommendations, this list is not exhaustive.

We are really witnessing an awakening of citizens to the negligence of governments blinded by their subservience to economic powers. The Spanish example and “municipalismo” infuse much of Europe and RIPESS , for whom the co-construction of public policies is a major axis of social transformation, is very happy about it.

Article written by Josette Combes

RIPESS contributes to GSEF’s – Global Social Economy Forum – policy dialogues in Europe and Latin America
GSEF Liverpool UK November 2019

The GSEF Regional Policy Dialogues are organized to promote the exchange of knowledge between policy-makers and key SSE actors. RIPESS has participated in both dialogues with the objective of contributing to the promotion of SSE and bringing the vision of local SSE projects to international fora.

RIPESS EU joined the 3rd edition of the European Policy Dialogue organised by Global Social Economy Forum (GSEF), our long term partners and collaborators.

This year, the Dialogue took place in Liverpool, United Kingdom, between the 18th and 19th of November 2019, around the theme ‘Building diversity and inclusion through the social solidarity economy’. A rich and open debate took place around this theme with a specific focus on 3 major topics:

  • How local governments must proceed with new approaches to create true inclusion
  • Moving beyond inclusion through innovative work-integration practices and policies
  • Social and Solidarity Economy: a driving force in enabling diverse future leaders

As RIPESS EU, we presented our work based mostly on the third topic, but of course with connection to all important SSE areas. Regarding the location of this year GSEF event, it was organized in partnership with the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority (LCRCA) and the University of Liverpool. And they were quite amazing hosts.

The day after the conference they organized an SSE actors tour across the city. Liverpool City Region is indeed a dynamic and vibrant SSE scene where they employ over 40,000 people in SSE organizations. We visited  Kuumba Imani Millenium Centre , main local spot for community activism, Baltic Creative CIC ,a unique area for gathering start-up and creative industries with huge focus on ownership and sharing, and Homebaked Bakery and Community Land Trust, a place of inspiration, with the best pie in the world and an amazing struggle against gentrification and speculative capital assault on land and houses.

Written by Alfonso Cotera (RIPESS LAC) and Drazen Simlesa (RIPESS EU)

Round tables in Lyon – “Cities and SSE: practical policies to transform the economy”

On the 4th of July 2019, in Lyon (France), RIPESS Europe with the support of the Municipality of Lyon organised a round table meeting on “Cities and SSE: practical policies to transform the economy”. In preparation of the World Social Forum on Transformative Economies to be held in Barcelona in 2020, it marked the beginning of the RIPESS Europe General Assembly which took place from the 4th to the 6th of July in Lyon. Given the fact that public authorities play a key role in defining policies which impact communities at different levels (housing, tourism, health, finance…) the occasion was given to highlight major practical trans-local and open, participatory policies which transform the economy.

The three-session event brought together RIPESS Europe members and partners, policy makers, local actors who shared their experience. The first panel on “Transforming cities through SSE practices and public policies” facilitated by Jason Nardi, the RIPESS Europe General Delegate was composed of Dounia Besson, Deputy Mayor of Lyon and representative of RTES (SSE Mayors network), Jeanine Verna, Director of the Arobase Vocational training centre and Julie Maisonhaute of Commerce equitable France (Fair trade movement).

For Dounia Besson, the strength of SSE is determined by its territorial anchoring and it is more than crucial to place the “inhabitants at the centre of all preoccupations regarding SSE initiative before shareholders”. In the dynamic of valorising and reinforcing SSE initiatives, the label LVED (Lyon ville equitable et durable / Lyon fair and sustainable city) was put in place. With regards to environmental protection, health, citizens’ participation, education, cultural development, the LVED SSE organisation of Lyon plays an active role in transforming economic practices and building a human society.

Jeanine Verna sees in the sustainability of SSE actions a vocational training dimension based on SSE values and principles. The Arobase vocational training centre created 30 years ago has trained more than 2000 SSE professional and promoted the convergence of different SSE families, in partnership with the XES Catalonia network and REVES network, through a recent European project. Therefore, training SSE local actors constitutes an essential resource which needs to be popularized and supported by local authorities.

Sustainable production and consumption has been at the heart of Fair trade movements and is today more necessary than ever. Julie Maisonhaute outlays an optimist view of a modern society bringing together citizens, civil society organisations, enterprises, local authorities with a common objective of mainstreaming fair-trade practices. Commerce equitable France has as its main mission to transform consumption modes, promote effective fair-trade skills, promote equality in public policies and help structure the fair-trade sector, therefore developing a strong alliance with local authorities is inevitable, which is what the Fair Trade Towns network is trying to do.

Josette Combes of MES (the French Solidarity economy Mouvement) facilitated the second session on “Citizens movements – Transformative cities”, with Melissa Koutouzis of the Transnational institute (TNI) and Geneviève Brichet of Mouvement Utopia as guest speakers.

The Transformative Cities Initiative, explains Melissa Koutouzis seeks to learn from cities and collectives working on solutions to ensure access to water, food, energy and housing. These basic human rights are threatened by the ongoing climate crisis and our increasingly dysfunctional political and economic structures, and the states, international institutions and transnational corporations that support them. “Strengthening local initiatives can induce a radical change at the global level” says Melissa. That is why TNI in partnership with several other networks, including RIPESS, is promoting the Transformative Cities Award and the Atlas of Utopias, which showcases inspiring stories of communities challenging entrenched power and boldly developing alternatives. These range from grassroots movements in Zimbabwe and Palestine to international cities like Paris or Barcelona that have defeated transnational corporations and hostile national governments to deliver democratic, people-powered solutions for access to basic human rights.

By putting in place a space of dialogue in between elected authorities and citizens, citizens participation is reinforced to induce endogenous change at the level of the society. This is the essence of the Citizens’ Transition Pact (Pacte pour la Transition Cityoenne), as Geneviève Brichet explains, a tool to promote and organize citizen participation to enable change in all municipalities, by encouraging dialogue between citizens and elected officials in the context of the campaigns for the 2020 Municipal Elections in France. The Citizens’ Transition Pact is at the same time: a list of 3 principles and 32 concrete and applicable measures in favour of the ecological, solidarity and democratic transition; the support by the transition network, through 50 partner organisations (Emmaus, Greenpeace, Enercoop, France Nature Environnement, etc.); a digital platform to connect, train and support participants.

Finally, the last session on “Convergence between initiatives to transform the economy and to free humanity” facilitated by Drazen Simlesa, RIPESS Europe Coordinator, had in its panel Elisabeth Voss from NETZ für Selbstverwaltung und Selbstorganisation (Germany), Iris Avinoa from the organising committee of the World Social Forum on Transformative Economies in Barcelona, Jean Roussiaud of APRES-GE and Geneviève Ancel, Coordinator of the Dialogues en Humanité.

Despite the plurality of SSE movements in Germany, a difficulty exists in federating these actors with the need to set up a concert space for common action. Therefore, “by supporting grassroot initiatives and Solidarity Economy, NETZ helps put in place a network of different actors to engage collectively”, says Elisabeth Voss. Regarding this, issues like climate change, and the future of work need to be approached in a sustainable way considering future generations.

The World Social Forum on Transformative Economies to be held in Barcelona in 2020, is another means of convergence between initiatives to transform the economy. Actors from all around the world will have the opportunity to meet and share their experience of major practices transforming the economy as wells as diverse approaches. Iris Avinoa made an overview of the preparation of this forum and the process behind it.

Jean Rossiaud presented the Jai Jagat initiative led by Rajagopal (which some are calling the new Gandhi) of the Ekta Parishad Movement in India. Starting on the 2nd of October 2019, it is a 10 000 km march from Gandhi’s resting place in New Delhi, crossing through 15 countries (Pakistan, Iran, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia, Bulgaria, Serbia, Northern Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Montenegro, Bosnia Herzegovina, Croatia and Italy and the Switzerland) and will promote the nonviolent economy movement’s perspective.

Geneviève Ancel concluded with a presentation of the Dialogues en Humanité, an international event where people from different origins, cultures, convictions all around the world meet to discuss about the practice of community building. The theme this year was let’s talked about tomorrow around 3 major themes: “All responsible for the rights of every one”, “Tomorrow, all nomads, tomorrow, all migrants” and “Inventing tomorrow by questioning the stories that shape our lives”, which and took place also in Lyon from the 5th to the 7th of July 2019.

Renewable energy cooperatives and local authorities
REScoop Zagreb may 2019

This year’s conference focuses on how REScoops and local authorities can transform communities through collaboration and features European REScoops, local authorities (including cities and municipalities) and a bunch of local stakeholders from the RIPESS network, the Compile project and the wider Balkan region.

This 3-day conference will take place in Zagreb, Croatia on Thursday 30th of May, Friday 31st of May and Saturday 1st of June 2019. The international conference on day 1 and 2 will coincide with the 6th General Assembly of REScoop.eu on day 3.

We start the conference on day 1 with a plenary session about Energy Remunicipalisation and a guided tour through Zagreb for REScoop.eu members.

On day 2, REScoops and municipalities will present information on how to accelerate the energy transition at the local level. European stakeholders will explain how citizen energy communities are organised in their respective countries and best practices of innovative collaboration between REScoops and local authorities in the Balkan region and beyond will be showcased. Finally, during several interactive sessions participants will be able to share thoughts and ideas

On day 3, more interactive workshop sessions will be organised, followed by REScoop.eu’s General Assembly

More info

Urban Alternatives: a new map to share transformative municipalist initiatives
urban alternatives

Urban Alternatives is a collaboration that brings together municipalist activists, academics, local governments, think-tanks and NGOs. The founding collaborators include participants from: Madrid 129, European Alternatives, Transnational Institute, Habitat International Coalition, MISTRA Urban Futures, Sheffield University Urban Institute, University of Aalborg, RIPESS Europe, P2P Foundation, Commons Network and the Global Platform for the Right to the City.

This mapping project looks to understand and map those initiatives that are emerging from the many urban social movements that are claiming the right to the city, occupying urban space, demanding social justice, democratic participation, cultural spaces and economic transformations. Largely hidden from our collective consciousness, this distributed and emergent set of actions demonstrated that it is not only possible to think of alternatives to the neoliberal paradigm, but that these alternatives are already happening. Our collaboration has two sets of goals:

1. To create the greatest possible visibility of positive urban transformation, revealing common dimensions of an emerging urban movement. We want to document – and to prove – that change is possible;

2. To create an ongoing process for developing common perspectives and understandings, supporting knowledge transfer between a diverse pool of actors, and providing opportunities for shared projects and common campaigns.

Brought into focus by the squares movement and the occupation of public space (from Tahrir to Puerta del Sol and Plaça de Catalunya, Taksim or Mong Kok), we’re witnessing a wave of initiatives ‘from below’ and ‘from the side’ that are looking to transform our urban environment. These initiatives – from the democratic remunicipalisation of energy production or the development of citizen policy-making mechanisms, through to the establishment of worker cooperatives to help meaningfully welcome refugees – all share a common thread. Not only do they pose a challenge to the increasing financialization of economy and commodification of urban space, they do so through putting faith in our own capacity to generate innovative projects, policies and prototypes that move us towards living our lives in common.

Go to the website: www.urbanalternatives.org

More farmers, better food: Nyéléni ECA releases CAP publication
More farmers better food CAP

Sustainable small farmers should be put at the core of EU agricultural policy, according to a new paper by the Nyeleni Europe and Central Asia Platform for Food Sovereignty [1]. The strongly documented publication comes ahead of a key vote in the European Parliament’s Agriculture Committee in early April, and represents the position of a pan-European coalition of farmers, peasants, pastoralists, fisherfolk, Indigenous Peoples and environmental organizations in regards to the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP).

The report highlights the alarming situation in rural areas and in the food system in the EU: Between 2005 and 2016, the number of farm holdings under 50 hectares fell by 29.4%. Over 4 million holdings disappeared in just 10 years. Increased numbers of seasonal, and often migrant workers suffer appalling working and living conditions. Pollution linked to agrochemicals continues to have a negative impact on public health – chemical residues are found in food, nitrate and phosphorus run-off pollutes water and soil. High levels of antibiotic use in animal farming leads to antimicrobial resistance. Around 88 million tons of food waste is generated per year, as a result of the industrial food chain. CAP has made the EU extremely dependent on cheap imports from regions with far lower environmental and social standards.

Stanka Becheva, food sovereignty campaigner at Friends of the Earth Europe said: “With the world facing multiple environmental and social crises, many of which are directly linked to how we feed ourselves, EU politicians need to listen to small-scale sustainable farmers who can help fix the climate crisis and the breakdown of the natural world. The food systems they create provide healthy, affordable, and local food for consumers, respects nature and climate, and create safe and dignified employment.”

Laying out the part of the report focused on what is needed from the CAP for this transition to be successful, Genevieve Savigny, farmer and representative of the European Coordination Via Campesina [2], says “the CAP must provide small-scale sustainable producers with the adequate political, economic and social support they need. This implies fair prices, setting a capping for direct payments and a redistribution of aid. Currently, less than 2% of CAP beneficiaries receive 30% of the total budget of direct payments. This must change. More money for rural development and a collective approach of projects where peasant agroecology is promoted must be put forth. And for our youth? Support to new farmers during the first years of their activity is essential.”

“This report also shows the environmental and social benefits of new, local partnerships between producers and consumers. It comes right in time to show that a new social contract between food producers and the societies they feed is highly awaited and urgently needed”, says Judith Hitchman from URGENCI, the international network of Community Supported Agriculture movements.

Download the report (in English) here.

Transformative Cities Award: still time to apply
Transformative Cities Award

The 2019 edition of the Transformative Cities initiative has started with the publication of the Open Call (Open until 15th of March).

We invite you to apply to the 2019 “Transformative Cities Award”; this open call being a great opportunity to highlight grassroot initiatives that have made a difference in their community on Housing, Energy, Water and Food Systems

RIPESS joined a group of organizations that are promoting the 2nd edition of the “Transformative Cities Award” aiming to highlight political practices and solutions that can serve as inspiration for others – See related information HERE.

In this second edition, the award is looking for initiatives that have succeeded in articulating an inclusive vision for a social majority to transform their city or defined environment. The prize aspires to create a new model of awards, which is participatory, inspirational, and rooted in exchanges and learning; the idea would be to highlight practices that can be replicated in other regions and places.

“Transformative Cities Award”: all you need to know!

You can find all the information of the prize here.

Or you can watch a video with basic information: https://youtu.be/yhhDkLPqIqo

Who can apply?

This initiative is open to collectives not individuals. A collective can have the form of a social movement with recognizable structures and goals without a formal legal recognition, a legally existing civil society organization, a citizens platform seeking to gain institutional power at municipal and/or city level via a political candidacy, an established city council, or other forms of collective action that centre their practices in a specific location that is not generally recognized as a region, state or similar delimitations.

Transformative… doing what?

The second edition of the award (2019) will look at the three issues of the first edition: Energy, Water and Housing plus an additional one: Food systems. Each initiative can also apply to several issues simultaneously under the same application.

Ok… but what do you mean by “transformative”?

“Transformative” recognizes that these struggles have succeeded in articulating an inclusive vision for a social majority to transform their city or defined environment. These practices will have measurable results, since they have been implemented successfully, and they will be practices that can be replicated in other regions and places. 

How they can submit their initiative?

Completing this online form or sending the attached Application form to transformativecities@tni.org

What is the deadline to submit the proposal?

They can submit their application until the 15th of March 2019 at 23.59h CET.

What is the selection criteria?

These are the key elements of a Transformative Practice:

  • Equity and participation
  • Capacity to inspire collective action
  • Impact
  • Transferability and replicability
  • Accountability and Transparency
  • Solidarity and Public ethos
  • Sustainability and efficiency
  • Fairness of labour conditions and the recognition of care and domestic work

It is just for “cities”?

The concept of “city” is a highly contested one, scientifically or politically. For the purpose of the award, they define cities in very broad terms as the locations for place-based struggles for basic rights. They understand that cities have certain strategic advantages to advance social, environmental and gender justice – in terms of combining critical masses of people as well as potential for more accountable governance. This will encompass transformative practices happening in urban and rural areas and in areas that could be described as both.

Who is behind this award?

The Transformative Cities initiative is launched by a group of regional and international organizations (in alphabetical order): European network for community-led initiatives on climate change and sustainability (Ecolise), Friends of the Earth International (FoEI), Global network of continental networks committed to the promotion of Social Solidarity Economy (RIPESS), Habitat International Coalition (HIC), the Global Platform for the Right to the City (GPR2C) and the Transnational Institute (TNI). 


Watch (and share and comment) this 2 minute video (English only for now – other languages coming soon): 

Twitter https://twitter.com/TransfCities/status/106269135219291340 
Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/TransfCities/videos/251609742180147/
Youtube https://youtu.be/yhhDkLPqIqo


Got any questions? See https://transformativecities.org/frequently-asked-questions 

You can help to promote it, forward this email and/or use the suggestions below.

Consider applying and spread the word with those who might want to use this opportunity.

Twitter

You can follow https://twitter.com/TransfCities 

Please RT this one https://twitter.com/TransfCities/status/1062691352192913409

Or send your own tweets, here you have some suggestions

.@TransfCities is launching the 2019 edition of #TransformativeCities Peoples Choice Award  .
 Apply, share your story of transformation and connect with other initiatives  https://transformativecities.org/open-call-201

In the face of #water, #energy, #food and #housing crises, communities worldwide are finding inspiring solutions. Are you working on transforming your community from below? Apply for the 2019 #TransformativeCities https://transformativecities.org/open-call-201

More suggestions and content here https://pad.tni.org/p/Transformative_Cities_Open_Call_Launch_2019 

Cool visuals here in English here:  https://nextcloud.tni.org/index.php/s/sYeF32HtrA8GbQx  

Facebook
Like Transformative Cities https://www.facebook.com/TransfCities/ 

And share the video we launch today calling to the open call https://www.facebook.com/TransfCities/videos/251609742180147/ 

YoutubePlease like us if you didn’t yet https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiSTZKtBfz7R5BC2fxrLsGg 

And take a look at the video https://youtu.be/yhhDkLPqIqo 

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