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UniverSSE2017
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Everything you wanted to know about SSE…

By Josette Combes (RIUESS)

It is the second edition of The Handbook on the Other Economy (Principes d’économie solidaire – Manuel de l’autre économie): directed by Eric Dacheux and Daniel Goujon, it is to be put in all hands, first and foremost those of the Master students, for whom it will be an abundant source of references, definitions, historical reminders, perspective and theoretical proposals. But even more importantly, it is a work of popularization in the noble sense of the term, which offers the opportunity, now that the term “solidarity economy” circulates in every direction – unfortunately often misused, for each citizen to familiarize him/herself with this economy, its foundations and its potential, so that it develops beyond the limited (though expanding) circle of its practitioners. Read more

Four new women’s co-operative projects open in Democratic Federation of Northern Syria (Rojava)

Co-operation in Mesopotamia is one of the Solidarity Economy Association (SEA)’s major, and most successful projects. Its aim is to foster international solidarity and further education about the largely women-driven co-operative economy that is growing, despite ongoing war, in the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria, commonly known as Rojava.

The project began with a research, translation and education focus, and over the past 3 years SEA has shared over 300 articles on the website, run around 30 workshops all over the UK, and developed strong relationships with many partners, including women’s economic bodies in Rojava, as well as co-ops and co-op bodies in the UK. The project has received overwhelmingly positive engagement, and the UK co-op movement is now much better informed about its counterpart in Rojava.

Here is the article of October 23

Four new women’s co-operative projects open in Democratic Federation of Northern Syria (Rojava)

Several new women’s co-operative projects have opened in the Jazira region of the Democratic Federation of Northern Syria (Rojava).

The projects focus on agriculture, animal husbandry, food, and clothing, and will contribute yet further to the thriving women’s economy in the region. They are located in the city of Hesekê and have been developed by the Women’s Committee in the Hesekê Economy Directorate.

The projects are run co-operatively and include:

A dairy farm in Hesekê’s El Silêymaniyê village, which has been built by 11 women and active since 1st September. Duha Mihemed, one of the women involved in the project, said that it was important for the spirit of partnership, and to prevent commercial fraud.

The Inanna Kitchen, which opened in the El Kelase village of Hesekê, where women prepare food for the winter and sell it for well below market prices, and prepare daily meals. One of the project’s partners, Zêneb Umer, said they are taking some of the burden off women’s shoulders.

The Ishtar Women’ Bakery in the El Nasre neighbourhood, opened by 8 women.

The Women’s Committee has been supporting the development of agriculture in Hesekê too, distributing most of the region’s arable land among 300 women. These women have started to produce crops in these plots, and wells will also be created in the coming days.

In addition, generators have been established along several of the city’s streets, providing power for 130 homes each.

Women’s Committee administrator Cewhera Mihemed said they are launching new projects to develop the women’s economy in the region though co-operatives.


 

 

Independent media talk about SSE

Independent media are close to the SSE, often by their status and especially by the values they defend. But how do they approach it? Here is a selection of independent media articles from the last three months. You can also find them on the map of socioeco.org: Journalism of Solutions (the articles are located in the city where the experience is taking place or, in the case of a general article, in the city where the media is based).

As you will see, the articles are in their original language, due to the diversity of European countries. For Greek, for which the Efsyn journal is particularly present with sometimes several articles per week on SSE, an English summary is included. This will allow you to perceive which themes are covered by these media: sustainable development, refugees, self-management, cooperatives, organic agriculture, etc. Feel free to send us an article or a media site to improve the map and our knowledge of SSE. Write to Françoise Wautiez: fwautiez[at]socioeco.org

Image of Terra Nuova

French
  • Se déplacer en milieu rural : ces territoires enclavés qui développent des alternatives sociales et solidaires
    Sophie Chapelle
    Article de Basta!, 16 novemnre 2018 [lire]
  • A Clermont-Ferrand, le succès d’une grande librairie reprise en coopérative par ses salariés
    Sophie Chapelle
    Article de Basta!, 19 octobre 2018 [lire]
Spanish
  • Nace el Foro de Consumo Responsable de Zaragoza, que velará por la extensión de políticas sostenibles y saludables a nivel local
    Artículo de Arainfo, 16 de noviembre 2018
    2018 [lire]
  • La Contratación Pública Responsable estrena nueva web y se abre a la participación de las personas usuarias
    Artículo de Arainfo, 13 de noviembre 2018 [lire]
  • Comercio Justo y Economía Solidaria, valores compartidos
    Artículo de El Salto,30/10/2018 [lire]
  • El Ayuntamiento de Zaragoza aprueba la primera Estrategia de impulso a la Economía Social de la ciudad
    Artículo de Arainfo, 22 de octubre 2018 [lire]
Catalan
  • Jordi Via, excomissionat d’ESS a l’Ajuntament de Barcelona: balanç d’una experiència, moment i perspectives
    Pep Valenzuela
    articulo de Malarrassa, 16/11/2018 [lire]
English
  • Why Co-ops and Community Farms Can’t Close the Racial Wealth Gap
    Zenobia Jeffries
    Article of Yes! Mafazine, Nov 09, 2018 [lire]
Italian
  • Un modello 100% biologico e’ possibile: l’esempio del Sikkim
    Articolo de Terra Nuova, 16 ottobre 2018 [lire]
  • L’economia per un mondo nuovo
    articolo de Comune.info, 11 ottobre 2018 [lire]
Greek
  • Οι άνθρωποι της Κ.ΑΛ.Ο. προχωρούν με προβλήματα αλλά και αισιοδοξία (The SSE people are moving with both problems and optimism)
    Ioanna Sotirchou
    Article of EFSYN, 12/11/2018 [lire]
  • Επιχορηγήσεις για υφιστάμενους φορείς Κ.ΑΛ.Ο.(Grants for existing SSE organizations)
    Article of EFSYN, 09/11/2018 [lire]
  • Στο Βελβεντό ο πρώτος αυτοδιαχειριζόμενος υδροηλεκτρικός σταθμός (In Velvento the first self-managed hydroelectric power station)
    Article of EFSYN, 04/11/2018 [lire]
  • Κοινωνικός αντίκτυπος για Κ.ΑΛ.Ο. (Social Impact of SSE)
    Ioanna Sotirchou
    Article of EFSYN, 29/10/2018 [lire]
  • Ροκάνι: ΚΟΙΝΣΕΠ για την κυκλική οικονομία (Rokani: in a circular economy)
    Aphrodite Tziantzi
    Article of EFSYN, 29/10/2018 [lire]
  • Οι εναλλακτικές στον καπιταλισμό είναι ήδη εδώ, ήταν πάντα εδώ! (Alternatives to capitalism are already here, they’ve always been here!)
    Hara Kouki
    Article of EFSYN, 15/10/2018 [lire]
  • Κουκάκι: η Κ.ΑΛ.Ο ξορκίζει το κακό (Koukaki: SSE excuses the evil)
    Aphrodite Tziantzi
    Article of EFSYN, 08/10/2018 [lire]
  • Συνεταιριστές όλης της Ελλάδας, συνεργαστείτε! (« Co-operatives all over Greece, work together!”)
    Aphrodite Tziantzi
    Article of EFSYN, 01/10/2018 [lire]
  • Κριτική και προτάσεις για να βελτιωθούν οι νόμοι για την ΚΑΛΟ (Criticism and suggestions to improve the laws for SSE)
    Ioanna Sotirchou
    Article of EFSYN, 1/10/2018 [lire]
  • «Ευρώπη, ήρθε η ώρα να τελειώσει η εξάρτηση από την ανάπτυξη!»(« Europe, it’s time for development dependency to end!”)
    Article of EFSYN, 24/09/2018 [lire]

 

Cordoba (Spain): Int. Meeting of Transformative Economies (December 6-7, 2018)
The Telegraph

The INTERNATIONAL MEETING OF TRANSFORMING ECONOMIES will take place on 6 and 7 December in Cordoba.

The III Solidarity Economy Congress announced for these dates has become an open appointment to experiences from other countries thanks to the willingness of the promoters to give this space a larger dimension, encompassing international references and relating to transforming economies with a transnational perspective.

Organized by REAS Andalusia and the University of Cordoba, the meeting will focus on analyzing, disseminating and relating transformative economic practices that are not only possible and alternatives but for many are already in the process of realization and able to demonstrate the validity of proposals that place people at the center of their development as protagonists of the economy. Related to each other because we share values and a common ethic that prevails over the intention of profit, the transforming economies will meet in Cordoba at the end of the year to become entangled with agents of SSE, public administrations, NGOs and with developing sectors, entrepreneurship, culture, education and people interested in making the economy a motor of social change towards more human coexistence, a fairer distribution and a transformed world from the sustainability of the environment and the care for life.

More info at:
Área de Cooperación y Solidaridad – Universidad de Córdoba
formacion.desarrollo@uco.es – (+34) 957 21 20 29
www.economiasolidaria.org/encuentro2018

UN poverty expert warns against tsunami of unchecked privatisation

Extract of UN displaynews

NEW YORK (19 October 2018) –  Widespread privatisation of public goods in many societies is systematically eliminating human rights protections and further marginalising those living in poverty, according to a new report.

Philip Alston, the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, criticised the extent to which the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and even the UN itself have aggressively promoted widespread privatisation of basic services, without regard to the human rights implications or the consequences for the poor. He also criticised human rights groups for not responding strongly enough to the resulting challenges.

“Privatising the provision of criminal justice, social protection, prisons, education, basic healthcare and other essential public goods cannot be done at the expense of throwing rights protections out of the window,” Alston said.

“States can’t dispense with their human rights obligations by delegating core services and functions to private companies on terms that they know will effectively undermine those rights for some people.”

He noted that while “proponents present privatisation as a technical solution for managing resources and reducing fiscal deficits, it has actually become an ideology of governance that devalues public goods, public spaces, compassion and a range of other values that are essential for a decent society.

“While privatisation’s proponents insist that it saves money, enhances efficiency, and improves services, the real world evidence very often challenges or contradicts these claims,” Alston said.

Privatisation is premised on fundamentally different assumptions from those that underpin respect for human rights, such as dignity and equality, he said. It inevitably prioritises profit, and sidelines considerations such as equality and non-discrimination. Rights-holders are transformed into clients, and those who are poor, needy, or troubled are marginalised or excluded. Human rights criteria are absent from almost all privatisation agreements, which rarely include provisions for sustained monitoring of their impact on service provision and the poor.

“Existing human rights accountability mechanisms are clearly inadequate for dealing with the challenges of large-scale and widespread privatisation,” Alston said. “The human rights community can no longer ignore the consequences of privatisation and needs to radically reconsider its approach.”

Human rights actors should start by reclaiming the moral high ground and reasserting the central role of concepts such as equality, society, the public interest, and shared responsibilities, while challenging the assumption that privatisation should be the default approach. “The human rights community needs to develop new methods that systematically confront the broader implication of widespread privatisation and ensure that human rights and accountability are at the centre of privatisation efforts,” Alston said.

There appear to be no limits to what states have privatised, he said. Public institutions and services across the world have been taken over by private companies dedicated to profiting from key parts of criminal justice systems and prisons, dictating educational priorities and approaches, deciding who will receive health interventions and social protection, and choosing what infrastructure will be built, where, and for whom, often with harsh consequences for the most marginalised. “There is a real risk that the waves of privatisation experienced to date will soon be followed by a veritable tsunami,” Alston said.

Privatisation of social protection often leads to a focus on economic efficiency concerns that aim to minimise time spent per client, close cases earlier, generate fees wherever possible, and cater to those better-off, pushing those with less resources and more complex problems to the margins.

 

Fair Trade and Solidarity Economy: shared values
November 22, 2018
0
Integrante del Co

El Salto Diario, blogs, October 30, 2018 article by Coordinadora estatal del comercio justo

Recently, coinciding with the third anniversary of the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals by the United Nations, we as Fair Trade have presented our new Charter. It is a text in which we update and reaffirm our principles and values, and claim the relevance of this Solidarity Economy movement in the face of the scandalous increase in inequality and environmental degradation.

In the new Charter, which has been endorsed by more than 400 organizations around the world, the Fair Trade movement denounces the failure of the current neoliberal system, a model that increases inequalities and poverty. A model that generates situations as unjust as 1% of the population possessing as much wealth as the rest of the planet’s inhabitants, and facing the interested and misinterpreted use of the term Fair Trade that has recently been made by certain political leaders (see Trump…), the Fair Trade movement clearly reaffirms what our values, principles and practices are. With the new Charter, Fair Trade wants to define the direction in which it wants to move forward. And we know that in that direction we are going to meet with other movements, with other groups of people, with other demands with which we have much in common.

One of them is the Solidarity Economy. In fact, Fair Trade is one of the movements that integrates this vision of an economy that puts “people, the environment and sustainable development as a priority reference over other interests”, as can be read in the Solidarity Economy Charter.

Both movements also share the importance of giving back to the economy its true purpose, that is, “to provide in a sustainable way the material bases for the personal, social and environmental development of the human being”. In the same way Fair Trade in the face of speculation, practices such as futures markets, commercial transactions without products, financial strategies that seek only economic profit at the expense of those who produce them, defends trade as a real exchange of goods, even more, as an interaction between people based on respect, transparency and dialogue. In short, a trade and an economy for life, to guarantee a better life for all. To trade for a living, not lo live for trading.

The six principles on which Solidarity Economy is based are closely related to those of Fair Trade. Let’s see:

The first of the principles of Solidarity Economy is that of equity, defined as the “value that recognizes all people as subjects of equal dignity and protects their right not to be subdued. […] A more just society is one that takes into account the differences that exist between individuals and groups. This principle of the solidarity economy finds its concretion in Fair Trade in its first principle, which highlights the disadvantageous situation in which many producer organizations find themselves, and starts from the idea that it is necessary to take this situation into account in commercial relations in order not to generate situations of abuse of power or exploitation.

Solidarity Economy establishes work as a second value understood as “a key element in the quality of life of people, the community and economic relations between citizens, peoples and States”. In this sense, Solidarity Economy highlights the importance of the human, social, political, economic and cultural dimension of work that allows people’s capacities to be developed.

Fair Trade also includes work from this same philosophy, as an element that must guarantee a dignified life. Work that is also understood as a way of participating in society. This aspect is particularly important for women. Fair Trade encourages their work in organisations and their participation in decision-making. In many countries and communities where the majority of women live relegated to the domestic and family space, favoring their productive activity outside the home is not only a way to increase their income but above all it gives them a new role in society, improves their self-esteem and changes the vision of the rest of society on the role of women. This change in mentality is gradually transforming society.

“We consider – affirms the Charter of Solidarity Economy – that all our productive and economic activity is related to nature, therefore our alliance with it and the recognition of its rights is our starting point. For Fair Trade, environmental sustainability is also a key aspect. It could not be otherwise if we bear in mind that for those who cultivate the land, this is their fundamental liveliihood. In addition, farming and artisan communities living in rural areas are especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change. This is why the development of production methods that are careful with nature and the establishment of measures to halt climate change is a fundamental aspect of Fair Trade.

The value of cooperation in the solidarity economy is defined as the importance of “collectively building a model of society based on harmonious local development, fair trade relations, equality, trust, co-responsibility, transparency, respect…”. Almost identical words can be found between the principles of Fair Trade to define how organizations should be and the relationships between producing and purchasing entities, which takes the form of practices such as long-term commercial relationships, avoiding unfair competition or the pre-financing of orders.

Another of the values of the model that defends the Solidarity Economy is that of not having lucrative ends, a bond with the essential purpose of this movement that is none other than the “integral, collective and individual development of people”. The means to achieve this would be “the efficient management of economically viable projects whose profits are reinvested and redistributed”. Purpose and means that are exactly the same in Fair Trade. Thus, for example, producer organizations reinvest the extra profits and the so-called “premium” in the organization itself or, alternatively, develop different educational, social, health or infrastructure projects in their community. The decision on the use of the benefits or premium is made in a democratic way, with the participation of workers. In this way, Fair Trade is also linked to the last of the principles of Solidarity Economy, number 6 “Commitment to the environment”, which is embedded in the “participation in the sustainable local and community development of the territory”.

We don’t want to go on much longer, but if we continue analysing the details of the Solidarity Economy and Fair Trade Charters we would find many more affinities. Affinities that constitute our main asset, our main strength to build the global society that we al need.

Tandem Europe: open call for social change through cultural innovation
October 18, 2018
0
Tandem Europe open call

Ideas Factory  – Bulgarian member of RIPESS Europe – is one of the promotors of the Tandem Europe cross-border collaboration program that aims at social change through cultural innovation activities. You and your initiative, organisation, institution or social enterprise can submit your expression of interest by 15 November 2018.

WHAT IS TANDEM EUROPE?

For our new edition of Tandem Europe, we look for applicants who work across a variety of urban or rural areas and local contexts all over Europe.
Future Tandem Europe participants typically manage smaller or larger cultural organisations (non-profit or public funded), work for culturally engaged local administrations or run socially orientated creative enterprises. Our participants share a strong enthusiasm for creative discovery and innovation across European borders, societies, cultures, sectors and artistic disciplines. They embrace the joy of making new things happen together by engaging in unusual transnational encounters.

With Tandem, you join a growing community of cultural innovators and social change makers, who are deeply engaged in maintaining and reshaping a common European future.

For more information and to apply for the call, see here.

Building up Social Solidarity Economy in Central Eastern Europe

By Karolína Silná, Ředitelka| Director Ekumenické akademii

At the RIPESS co-organized European Social Solidarity Economy Congress “UniverSSE”, held in Athens in June 2017, the need for advocating for an economy that meets the needs of all people treating them as citizens and right holders instead of addressing them simply as consumers or stakeholders was emphasized as well as further training of practical Social Solidarity Economy (SSE) skills: not only how to start a social enterprise and other SSE initiative but also how to develop/innovate and how to run activities sustainably in the longer-term perspective. This could be creating an alternative market, an ecosystem of sustainable businesses – in a horizontal way (sustainable supply chain) and vertical way (intersectoral approach). Furthermore skills of community building seem to be essential, advocacy actions as well as campaigning and communicating the values of Social Solidarity Economy.

This was an impulse to develop a project, that would facilitate the spread of SSE activities by providing knowledge, skills and competences, with a special regional focus on Central-Eastern Europe. The joint project of RIPESS Europe and organisations from the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland and Austria is called „Building up Social Solidarity Economy“ and was successfull in the 2018 call of Erasmus + educational programme of the EU. The project will start in October 2018 and the primary goal is to create an informal innovative European training programme of 4 modules on different aspects of Social Solidarity Economy. The educational materials and training tools will be produced in the languages of the involved countries and also in English, to make them available for a broader audience. An important part of the project is also to develop cooperation and networking at the regional and European level during different events.

The project partners are representing various forms of supporting Social Solidarity Economy and entrepreneurship, placed in different context and will bring together very innovative practices and experiences.

The project partners are: RIPESS Europe, Ecumenical Academy (Czech Republic), Dobrze Food Cooperative (Poland), Utopia (Slovakia), Katholische Sozialakademie Österreichs (Austria)

More information to come soon…

 

 

 

A Colombian delegation In Occitania (France)

By Bérénice Dondeyne, Co-President MES Occtianie, member of the RIPESS Europe Coordination Committee

Présenation artisanat Colombie

 

Following the GSEF in Bilbao, the Movement for the Solidarity Economy Occitania welcomed with great pleasure a Colombian delegation from 7 to 12 October 2018! Meetings with elected officials and field workers were organized by Denis Coutens and Bérénice Dondeyne, co-chairs. Colombia enjoys extraordinary ecological diversity and has natural reserves in the Amazon recognized by UNESCO. A lot of exchanges around a local agriculture of quality guaranteeing food self-sufficiency and articulated around a rural citizen community of “farmers”! Engaged in a peace process with FARC, Colombia is entering a new phase in which the Social and Solidarity Economy occupies a central place. Cooperatives are already shaping a new relationship to the “commons”, to land and property and, of course, to the distribution of wealth. Thanks to partners such as Alfredo Cadena, CODEMA y PROVIVIENDA, César Díaz, CIMA (Cumbre de los pueblos del Macizo), Julián Díaz, Asociación Campesinos Putumayo, Mario Anatole Vega, ProComún, Turismo del Común, we have discovered a range of natural and organic products, products of excellence with high nutritional and culinary value (seeds, oils, beans….) or plant handicrafts for which a distribution channel can be considered here in the Occitania region (France). Initial contacts have been made. To be continued….

 

Thank you to La Région Occitanie / Pyrénées-Méditerranée O’Saveurs-Paysannes Ville d’Albi Artisans du Monde Toulouse MIRAMAP Lycée Fonlabour Albi who all put responsible agriculture and food at the heart of their concerns. This trip is part of the dynamic that our Ripess and Ripess Europe networks are driving. The Delegation was accompanied by the Fabrica, a social innovation cooperative in Barcelona (Dorys Ardila/Josep Maria Navarro), Intaini, a Franco-Colombian NGO (Amparo Theret in Toulouse supported the inter-knowledge between Occitan and Colombian actors).

O'Saveurs Paysannes Bienvenida

 

FRESS Occitanie ! 18th edition
October 16, 2018
0
Fress Occitanie 2018 affiche

18th Regional Forum of Social and Solidarity Economy

in Occitanie

23 and 24 November 2018

SSE” symposium: You said you were changing scale ” crossed views of actors/entrepreneurs/researchers/researchers

The 18th Regional Forum of the Social and Solidarity Economy will put SSE actors at the centre of reflection and research and will join researchers to talk about a change of scale in SSE! Built with the Université Jean Jaurès and the Master Nouvelle Economie sociale, created by Jacques Prades, the Forum will honour the work of scientists who have contributed to a theoretical reflection on SSE in France and around the world: Jean-Louis Laville, Jean-François Draperi, Geneviève Azam will be present. Conferences, workshops, citizen debates….. as many spaces during two days to define together what we want in terms of social utility? What size of company? What financing? What governance? With which territorial roots?

Ripess Europe will be invited for a round table discussion on “scaling up in SSE, a European issue”

Crédit Coopératif, in the person of Jean-Louis Bancel, will chair the final conferences before an audience of elected representatives, citizens and SSE companies!

info of FRESS : www.fress-occitanie.fr
and on the social networls
#ESSjelabooste
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