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UniverSSE2017
Video
European Project VET-2 (2018-2020): Mapping for Trainers is Out
ssevet2

One of the main objectives of this Erasmus+ VET-2 project is to develop a competence profile for SSE trainers in different disciplines of VET studies. This report explores the possibility of integrating VET trainers’ competences in existing training programs. In order to do so, the organisations and networks part of the project – from Greece, Italy, France, Germany, Portugal, Romania – participated to a survey to explore elements that will be introduced in trainers competence profile adjusted to SSE requirement.

Thus, in this report “Mapping of trainers’ competences and existing SSE training programs”, partners proceeded to an in depth analysis of the situation, with the help and answers of the people most fitted to answer: the trainers themselves. Interviews and desk research were used for data collection. Unveiling opportunities and constraints to develop SSE VET curricula, this report is an important contribution for the partners and RIPESS Europe to help overcome the inadequacy of the Occupational Standard, reaching out for all potential trainees.

SSE vision and practices opens a new pathway on many issues such as nature and future of work, local development, social responsibility, education, training, etc. In that context, there are many opportunities for further SSE integration in VET trainings.

See also :

The World Social Forum of Transformative Economies. Promoting synergies

By Josette Combes

The preparatory meeting for the WSFTE was held in Barcelona on 5, 6 and 7 April 2019. It brought together more than 300 people from all over the world, more than half of whom came naturally from Catalonia and Spain. For RIPESS international members from Africa, Latin America, North America, Asia and more from Europe (18 countries represented), this meeting was an excellent opportunity to share their experiences with people working in other parts of the world and in very diverse fields.

There were representatives of structures dedicated to the development of municipalities, the defence of agro-ecology, the promotion of eco-feminism, ecohousing, social currencies and ethical finance, popular education, alternative media and, of course, social and solidarity economy networks.
The place was well suited for this meeting. The Aula Magna University in Barcelona offered suitable rooms and above all an outdoor space conducive to informal exchanges during meals. The animation of the many workshops was very structured and but too vague at times. The participants sometimes considered that what was proposed for reflection pre-formatted the course of the debates a little too much. It must be recognized that the ambition of the meeting required that it be planned. The whole thing gave the impression of a promising potential but one that lacked the space and time to deploy further.

This test run augurs well for a series of rich interactions but also shows the difficulties in establishing the convergences that are essential to ensure a future for the species living on the planet, an increasingly important part of which is threatened with extinction, and ultimately the human species itself. Even if a certain awareness is beginning to grow, especially among the younger generations, it is urgent to gather all the energies to shift the current economic paradigms from a mad rush to profit towards a rational management of resources and a better social and ecological balance. All the parameters mentioned above will allow this fundamental change of direction.
All these dimensions, worked on by groups in a way that is still too often considered marginal or experimental, are still fragmented. Together, they form a coherent holistic approach in which each party can consider itself a legitimate actor. It is not only a question of fighting against but also of proposing concrete, current and effective actions, capable, through their demonstration, of attracting the support of a larger mass of people who will themselves become actors of change. Finally, these meetings, by providing an opportunity for the exchange of knowledge and know-how, contribute to strengthening the determination of the activists of all these networks and in a context where threats from authoritarian governments are increasing, this last point is far from being superfluous.
To achieve its objective, the WSFTE must adopt a more “intercultural” approach that better articulates the networks that were present this spring in Barcelona, so that all those who have visited it feel really empowered.

SSE of culture, culture of SSE, the RIUESS conference in Marne la Vallée, deep and joyful

By Josette Combes

On 15, 16 and 17 May, the Réseau Interuniversitaire de l’Economie Sociale et Solidaire held its conference, this time hosted by the Université Paris – Est Marne la Vallée. This was the nineteenth edition of this event, which brings together SSE researchers and actors every year, this year under the title SSE of culture, culture of SSE. More than 200 participants were able to exchange ideas within a renovated university, in very good conditions of comfort and accompanied by a team of staff and students of the Chair of Social and Solidarity Economy, under the kind responsibility of Hervé Defalvard.

The opening conference was given by Farida Shaheed, Executive Director of the Shirkat Gah-Women Resource Centre (Pakistan) and former and first UN Special Rapporteur on Cultural Rights. Laura Aufrère, who initiated this invitation, introduced Farida and stressed the importance of her work in understanding the multiple dimensions of cultural rights.

Laura Aufrère and Farida Shaheed


Farida Shaheed, while saying she knew little about SSE, said in the preamble that respect for human rights is an unfailing foundation of an economy that claims to be inclusive. Cultural rights allow the development of specific worldviews and the resulting ways of life. According to the United Nations definition, it is “the right of everyone to take part in cultural life and to benefit from scientific progress and its applications”. Culture is never static, it is always evolving. Similarly, no community can be referred to a single culture knowing that there is always a dominant culture that power imposes to the detriment of so-called minority cultures, including those of women, youth, ethnic minorities, etc. Cultural rights include the right to criticize, contradict and reformulate the parameters of the dominant culture.


According to Farida, one cannot talk about cultural rights without addressing the issue of gender. While women play a fundamental role in cultural transmission, their influence in decision-making is limited and rules are defined little or not at all by women. They face different forms of violence for acts as simple as choosing whether and with whom they want to marry, how to dress and where they are allowed to go. When they violate these rules, enacted without their advice, they are sentenced on the pretext of treason. This is why it is urgent to change the paradigm and place women on an equal footing in their role as spokespersons for what must be transmitted or abandoned from a culture undergoing renovation. Similarly, young people or the marginalized must regain their right to expression and influence.

In her presentation, Farida Shaheed also addresses the issue of access to technologies and the problem of transferring the results of research conducted in public laboratories to the public interest. It also highlights the danger faced by artists whose expression can be censored because it is perceived as threatening to the cultural status quo and thus the right to artistic expression is linked to the right to peaceful assembly, freedom of association including the right to form trade unions, the right to benefit from the moral and material protections related to their production and the right to leisure.

There is also a real demand for the restoration of historical truths that have been abused by “official history, especially for the peoples who have suffered colonization. In conclusion, Farida emphasizes the importance of respecting diversity by using the metaphor of the damage caused by monoculture in agroecology. Human ecology needs space and time for multidimensional exchanges.

Two upcoming events were announced in plenary: the World Social Forum of Transformative Economies in May 2020, with which RIUESS will be associated, and the 2nd International SSE Forum “Co-constructing reciprocity in North-South relations”, which will take place in Carthage (Tunisia) on 15-17 April.

There were 10 workshops or 30 contributors in two sessions, according to 5 main axes: the modes of organization of SSE in and through culture, SSE cultures between pluralism, isomorphism and new paths, alliances between culture and SSE, interculturality in SSE, minority, diversity at the crossroads of SSE and culture. (contributions will soon be available on the website as well as on socioeco.org.)

The round table moderated by Patricia Coler (UFISC) Culture and Territory examined the place of local agreements in the dynamics of territories.
Finally, the students had organized the gala evening with film screenings and music for dancing, a very cheerful evening. The twentieth meeting is scheduled for May 27,28,29 2020 in Clermont-Ferrand.

Independent media talk about SSE

Independent media are close to the SSE, often by their status and especially by the values they defend. But how do they approach it? Here is a selection of independent media articles from the last three months. You can also find them on the map of socioeco.org: Journalism of Solutions (the articles are located in the city where the experience is taking place or, in the case of a general article, in the city where the media is based).

As you will see, the articles are in their original language, due to the diversity of European countries. For Greek, for which the Efsyn journal is particularly present with sometimes several articles per week on SSE, an English summary is included. This will allow you to perceive which themes are covered by these media: sustainable development, refugees, self-management, cooperatives, organic agriculture, etc. Feel free to send us an article or a media site to improve the map and our knowledge of SSE. Write to Françoise Wautiez: fwautiez[at]socioeco.org

Cover picture from Reporterre L’eusko basque, première monnaie locale européenne

French

  • [Tribune] Monnaies locales : 10 leviers pour les développer à grande échelle, Samuel Sauvage, Tribune de Social Alter, 01/03/2019 [lire]
  • L’eusko basque, première monnaie locale européenne, Chloé Rébillard, Article de Reporterre, 27 mars 2019 [lire]
  • L’industrie sociale et solidaire : mais si, c’est possible ! (Vitamine T), Article de The Conversation, 17/04/2019 [lire]
  • Le travail collectif est un principe fondateur de l’économie solidaire Hafid Azzouzi, Article de El Watan, 8 mai 2019 [lire]
  • Changer l’entreprise avec l’économie sociale et solidaire, Jerôme Saddier, Tribune de Alternatives Economiques, 23/05/2019 [lire]

English

  • Using Employee Ownership to Build a More Equitable Future for Work Melissa Hoover, Article of Non Profit Quarterly, 2019 [lire]
  • Explosion of Interest in Worker Cooperatives Drives Economic Changes, Brian Van Slyke, Article of Truthout, 24/04/2019 [lire]
  • Unions and co-ops – a new way forward for workers?, Miles Hadfield, Article of thenews.coop, 29 April 2019 [lire]

Spanish

  • Políticas para una economía más justa, democrática y sostenible Emma Gascó, Blog El Salto Diario, 9 de abril 2019 [lire]
  • Nace la Red de Economía Alternativa y Solidaria de Castilla-La Mancha, articulo de eldiario.es, 15/04/2019 [lire]
  • Este bloque de viviendas en Madrid demuestra que lo ecológico no es solo para ricos, Sara Acosta, articulo de eldiario.es, 14/04/2019 [lire]
  • Sobre la economía de la economía solidaria, Alfonso B. Bolado, articulo de eldiario.es, 26/04/2019 [lire]
  • Propiedad colectiva para evitar la especulación: así funcionan las cooperativas de vivienda en Uruguay, María García Arenales, articulo de eldiario.es, 19/04/2019 [lire]
  • Economía solidaria y cooperativas en Rojava, Artículo de Kaosenlared, 10 de mayo 2019 [lire]
  • Una cita mundial para fortalecer las economías transformadoras, Blog de El Salto, 29 de mayo 2019 [lire]

Catalan

  • L’habitatge cooperatiu arriba a Nou Barris per trencar esquemes Xavi Fernández de Castro, Articulo de El Mon, 26/03/2019 [lire]
  • L’Economia Solidària, un repte per assolir als Instituts de Secundària
    Blog de Pam a Pam, 1/04/2019 [lire]
  • Erika Licón: “Els procesos d’aprenentatge de l’Economia Social i Solidària és donen en l’acció”, Jordi de Miguel, Articulo de El Critic, 13/05/2019 [lire]

Portuguese

  • Sem terra colhem 16 mil toneladas de arroz orgânico, Gilson Camargo, Articulo de Extra Classe, março 2019 [lire]

Greek

  • Συμμετοχικός σχεδιασμός (Participatory planning), Aphrodite Tziantzi, Article of EFSYN, 13/05/2019 [lire]
  • «Το κοινωνικό κράτος πρέπει να το διασφαλίζουν οι κυβερνήσεις» (« The welfare state must be guaranteed by governments »), Michael Angelos Konstantopoulos, Article of EFSYN, 08/04/2019 [lire]
  • Είναι χρήσιμο να είμαστε όλοι… Κ.ΑΛ.Ο.μαθημένοι! (It is helpful to be all … SSE), Ioanna Sotirchou, Article of EFSYN, 08/04/2019 [lire]
  • Η κοινωνική οικονομία πάνω από τις πολιτικές διαφωνίες (Social economy beypnd political disagreements), Michael Angelos Konstantopoulos, Article of EFSYN, 01/04/2019 [lire]
  • Ο κόσμος της αλληλεγγύης συναντήθηκε στη Γεωπονική (The world of solidarity meets agriculture), Aphrodite Tziantzin Article of EFSYN, 18/03/2019 [lire]
  • Οργάνωση «από τα κάτω» σε καιρό κρίσης (Organization « from the bottom » in a time of crisis), Ioanna Sotirchou, Article of EFSYN, 18/03/2019 [lire]
  • Το όραμα ενός αστέγου για ένα βιβλιοπωλείο και η αλληλεγγύη του κόσμου (The vision of a homeless for a bookstore and the solidarity of the world), Ioanna Sotirchou, Article of EFSYN, 04/03/2019 [lire]
  • Συμπόσιο για την Κοινωνία Πολιτών και την Κ.ΑΛ.Ο. (Symposium on Civil Society and SSE), Ioanna Sotirchou, Article of EFSYN, 04/03/2019 [lire]
Resources for June 2019 (in collaboration with socioeco.org)

In the framework of the 100th anniversary of ILO, we have decided to show which ILO documents related to SSE are referenced on socioeco.org.

We can divide them in 6 main blocks . We present a few examples in the different langages of what is there and invite you to visit the ILO page on socioeco.org:

ILO Position papers on SSE

ILO SSE Academy readers

Every year, – the 10th edition is being hold in this moment-, ILO helds a SSE academy : The Academy targets people responsible for the promotion of SSE around the world, including policy-makers, practitioners, researchers and representatives of workers’ and employers’ organizations.. For example :

A radio series on SSE

A Public Policies for the SSE series

Cooperatives

Illustrated by The Story of the ILO’s Promotion of Cooperatives Recommendation, 2002 (No.193) A review of the process of making ILO Recommendation No. 193, its implementation and its impact (see the original recommandation here), you will find 5 subsections for coops :

1. Legislation  on coops:

2. The role of coops

3. Contribution of cooperatives to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) (12 up to now)

4. Pedagogical tools :

5. Issues tackled by cooperatives : migrants, child care, informal economy, agriculture, youth employment, waste management, relations with trade unions, clean energy, finance, etc.

Have a good reading !

Publication: Our Commons. Political ideas for a New Europe

Our Commons by Sophie Bloemen and Thomas de Groot features reflections on the enclosure of knowledge and the monopolisation of the digital sphere, stories about renewable energy cooperatives and community foodwaste initiatives and urgent pleas to see the city as a commons and to treat health as a common good. Published by the Institute of Network Cultures, the book is first published online as an e-book, free for all to download and share and as a printable PDF. The book will also be available on a wide variety of print-on-demand platforms.

Good food is good for Europe

Translation of the article in Italian “Il cibo buono fa bene all’Europa” by Manlio Masucci, in Comune.info, 6 May 2019

A common agricultural policy that focuses on food quality, agroecology and the social rights of those who work can relaunch the EU in crisis. Olivier De Shutter, president of Ipes-Food, speaks to us.

A common agricultural policy could make a decisive contribution to the development of sustainable food systems and the relaunch of the EU’s integration project. An ambitious proposal, destined to face the numerous challenges that characterize the sector: from the low-cost junk food that floods our markets to the new generation of commercial treaties, from the widespread illegality to the exploitation of workers to the system of public subsidies that facilitate the large standardized mass production. We asked Olivier De Shutter, co-chairman of Ipes-Food, former UN Special Commissioner for the Right to Food and current member of the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, how to address these problems at a time when public confidence in the EU seems to be at an all-time low.

De Shutter, citizens are harassed by the economic crisis and often choose to save money by buying bad quality food at low cost. How to convince them that this is not the best solution? The solution is not just to tell people to eat healthier food. We need to make the health option easier for everyone, especially for low-income groups. This means using a range of tools – urban planning, tax incentives (e.g. taxes on sodas or zero VAT on fruits and vegetables) and public procurement – to build healthy food environments. We need an adequate social safety net. Cheap calories can no longer replace social policies, which need to be rebuilt and redesigned to address the root causes of poverty and promote access to healthy food for all. Europe is approving new trade treaties that open the door to waves of junk food and feed unsustainable production systems. What is your position? The EU’s business model promotes trade in goods at ever-increasing volumes, despite contradictions with health and sustainability objectives. For example, the FTA with Japan is based on increased export opportunities in the high-emission meat and dairy sectors. Simply put, the EU and its Member States must completely rethink this model.

The report supports the need to rebuild confidence in the EU. Could a new food policy be the vehicle for relaunching the proEuropean project? Food is a source of great concern for citizens. By acting in this area and responding to what citizens want – healthy, sustainable and locally produced food – the EU can assert its relevance and importance. The idea of a food policy is inherently more democratic than current sectoral policies. By shifting the focus from agriculture to food, a wider range of stakeholders can be significantly involved in policy design and evaluation. How can a new food policy benefit workers in the sector? In Italy there is the phenomenon of immigrants forced to work in the fields in conditions of similar slavery. How to deal with widespread illegality? The most powerful actors in the food sector are able to put pressure on wages and working conditions. The cost of this is borne by farm labourers, fast food personnel and delivery personnel. This is happening in the EU and around the world. A common food policy would address this problem on three fronts. First, as well as applying due diligence to food importers, it would accelerate the reforms already underway at European level to crack down on unfair trade practices and abuses of buyer power in supply chains. Secondly, it would oblige operators to disclose the true costs of food production, allowing negative impacts on workers’ welfare to be made visible.Third, a common food policy would refocus EU policies in support of the alternative food system and short supply chain initiatives to ensure fair revenues for farmers and food workers.

In Italy 15% of the cultivated area is organic but about 97% of public incentives go to conventional agriculture. We are also well above the European average for pesticide consumption. Could a common policy help to improve this situation? A common food policy would reduce dangerous pesticides and chemical exposures by using various policy instruments, with increasing ambition over time. Steps to enhance the environmental vocation of the CAP would be combined with measures needed to develop diversified, low-input agroecological systems through research, better soil monitoring and a crackdown on endocrine disrupters (EDCs) in food packaging. With more stringent regulations, and demonstrating the benefits of agroecological alternatives, the EU would no longer be held hostage by short-term solutions. Therefore, in the long term, the EU could gradually phase out the systematic use of harmful pesticides such as glyphosate.

Young Italians are looking with increasing interest at the land for job opportunities while farmers’ markets are growing even in large cities. How can a common food policy support this process? Building shorter and fairer supply chains is one of the five key objectives of a common food policy. Tools already exist to support direct sales and short supply chains (e.g. in rural development), but they are rarely adopted by Member States and poorly implemented. Under a common food policy, more funding would be allocated to these initiatives and to local structures to support them through, for example, local food policy councils and urban food policies. Member States would be obliged to develop coherent strategies to support short supply chains and territorial initiatives. EU support instruments would also be redefined to be more accessible to small farmers and local food initiatives.

Common Agriculture and Food Policy for Radical Ecological Change

Article of URGENCI

URGENCI, the Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)1 network and its national members from 12 European countries held an advocacy capacity building session in Brussels. This training session took place on the 14th, 15th, 16th of May. CSA advocates had an unprecedented opportunity to share experience and to refine their key messages.

URGENCI and its members believe it is high time to raise the voices of CSA. In the run up to the European elections, candidates should listen carefully to the voices of this grassroots movements. The specificity of CSA is that it is a concrete step towards a new social contract between producers and the societies they feedexplains Mathias von Mirbach, a CSA farmer from Germany. CSA is one of the most effective tools to help sustainable family farmers and conscious consumers regain control of local and territorial food systems.The CSA model is highly efficient when it comes to fighting food waste, preserving cultivated agro-biodiversity and consolidating local economies and employment. The nutrition provided by fresh, local agroecologically grown fruit and vegetables is now recognised as essential in fighting Non Communicable Disesases (NCDs) such as diabetes, obesity and heart problems and cancer. CSA initiatives therefore make a direct contribution to improving the health of European citizens. Its social and environmental contributions should be more clearly recognised. Direct payments and other measures of direct support should be directed towards producers who sell locally through CSA and other direct schemes.

These voices join the vibrant call for a Common Food Policy: there is a urgent need to repair the lack of coherence between policies implemented by the different DGs of the European Commission. We need to connect agriculture with health and nutrition, social inclusion and the environment. It is vital for thousands of CSA farms across Europe to ensure that agroecology and sustainability are promoted as overarching principles, and are prioritised over industrial agriculture, competition and corporate profits. “As part of the Nyeleni Europe Movement for Food Sovereignty, we in URGENCI are convinced that it is equally essential to ensure small-scale agroecological producers are at the core of this radical change towards a Common Food Policy, and ensure European citizens have access to healthy, nutritious food”, stresses Isabel Alvarez, Vice-President of URGENCI.

Now is the time for radical change. A change that is already well under way in the CSA. movement.

Contact: Jocelyn Parot, +33 6 84 68 52 82, jocelyn.parot@urgenci.net, www.urgenci.net

1Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is a direct partnership between people and one or severalproducer(s), whereby the risks, responsibilities and rewards of farming are shared, through a long-term, binding agreement.

Vote for a Social Solidarity Europe !
vote SSEurope flags

Open letter to candidates standing in the European Parliamentary election

The Intercontinental Network for the Promotion of the Social Solidarity Economy (RIPESS) brings together national and territorial networks in Europe with a 360° transformative vision that is economic and ecological, democratic, social and societal. We are committed to change in the economic practices and imagination: 

  • Rehabilitate cooperation, solidarity and equity in a break with existing unbridled competition
  • Focus on the emancipation of individuals, economic citizenship and human rights as higher principles
  • End the waste of resources, the indiscriminate use of pollutants, the excessive pursuit of profit

The European Parliament elections will be held between 24th and 26th May 2019. Let us consider Article 3 of the EU Treaty, in particular paragraphs 1, 2 and 3: “1. The Union’s aim is to promote peace, its values and the well-being of its peoples. It promotes economic, social and territorial cohesion and solidarity between States”. 

This new Parliament will undoubtedly have to face a very challenging situation within the European Union, and in the world: accelerating climate threats, extinction of animal species, deteriorating living conditions, the phenomenon of migration. Moreover, the increase in authoritarian political regimes has become blatant, as an appempt to stifle the growing aspiration of peoples to access their fundamental rights. As a result of all the above, the European ideal is under severe threat and the European ideal of peaceful cohesion of peoples has lost its credibility with those living in the ever-growing precariousness that is the outcome of a blind, globalized economic system. 

In the face of these challenges, European citizens are organizing, proposing appropriate solutions and re-creating a relocalised social and solidarity economy, that is respectful of biotopes, and anchored in social justice and the common good. They encourage consultation with local institutions, enterprises and elected officials. This solidarity model is expanding rapidly in Europe and throughout the world, makes it possible to create an economy that supports the well-being of our societies, allying producers and consumers in responsible production and consumption models. It makes a significant contribution to the territorial cohesion and the preservation of resources through their intelligent use. It ensures that planetary boundaries are not exceeded.

This new parliament has the duty to take on board that European electors wish to be consulted beforehand and become active stakeholders in the policies, laws and rules that affect them and influence the future of the planet ,and build peace in the world.

We request you take position on the following ten points

1. It is fundamental to take the path of a more ethical, responsible and solidarity-based redistributive economy in which the Social solidarity economy is fully recognised as an exemplary economic model that increases wellbeing and peace within Europe. Similarly, in a transversal way across sectoral policies, we call on you to build and pass the necessary laws to do so.

2. Food and agriculture that respects the soil, air and water, eliminates the use of toxic inputs that have a dangerous impact on human health and living species and promotes decent incomes for small and medium-sized farms by limiting industrial agriculture, processing and distribution models and developing short food chains with traceability and approved by consumers and producers.

3. Low-carbon transport infrastructure that services terriorities and meets local peoples’ needs and specifically rehabilitates rail and inland waterway transport, public transport, special bicycle lanes and shared forms of transportation.

4. A renewable energy development policy based on the production of eco-designed, solidarity-based and sustainable goods and services and breaks with the current obsolete fossil fuel-based model that is both harmful to the climate and dangerous.

5. An ambitious European Social Rights Pillar and a unified European labour code based on the Gothenburg Social Summit (16-18 November 2017), that supports access to protective social rights (pension,health cover, unemployment rights, training, etc.), and eliminates harmful social dumping on countries where companies relocate in the community and establish intolerable working conditions that fly in the face of decent work (see RIPESS Europe contribution). This includes the recognition and construction of cultural rights in Europe (in line with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Fribourg Declaration on Cultural Diversity , the UNESCO Declaration on Cultural Diversity, Earth Chart and the Declaration of Peasants Rights and Rights of Other People living in Rural Areas), and the respect of Indigenous Peoples and local cultures.

6. Ongoing commitment to fight against all forms of discrimination based on gender, origin, sexual orientation and religion by developing an educational system oriented towards an understanding of our common belonging to humanity, whose future depends on our solidarity and cooperation.

7. An ambitious common policy for human rights, open borders and economic citizenship for migrants that ensure the immediate integration of people in compliance with international conventions for the protection of human rights (UN conventions and the main conventions previously adopted by the Council of Europe, International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families/ICRMW).

8. A coherent plan to build and consolidate economic conditions in countries that are sources of migration for the benefit of local communities through the implementation of Social Solidarity Economy framework legislation and programmes. The European Union also needs to exert pressure on large companies when the level of predation on resources dispossesses local populations through notoriously unethical procedures, rather than support them.

9. Support for education that emphasizes civic engagement, cooperation rather than competition, a fair and redistributive economy and ecological awareness that are conducive to transitional innovations.

10. A regulated financial system, that promotes ethical non-speculative public finance that serves a transformative solidarity economy and communities and a plurality of alternative and complementary social and local currency systems, which do not create debt but promote fair trade, and sustainable relocalised local development.

All these policies are necessary. The social solidarity economy movement as a whole can collectively and democratically implement them. Your active participation in this process is indispensible. Your position – and our votes – are key in providing the opportunity to open the future towards greater social justice, economic democracy and economic vigilance.

RIPESS Europe and its members will support your efforts and relay the declarations of intent that support these positions. We invite you to join us and participate in the construction of the World Social Forum of Transformative Economies that will be held in Barcelona in 2020.

April 2019

RIPESS EU members on European elections

ROMANIA : CRIES will promote Sustainable Consumption and Production in the campaign for European Parliament!

As part of the European campaign #Trade Fair Live Fair, CRIES and its partners will launch a debate about the importance to stand up for a different consumption and production model. More than 5.000 citizens, activists and politicians will be involved in different events as thematic workshops, conferences, films projection and street events.

On May 11, several activities related to the World Fair Trade Day will take place in Timisoara and Iasi. In November 2019, we will organize in Bucharest the first edition of Fair Trade Breakfast, an event that would bring together Romanian and European decision makers, NGOs and activists.

Romania is one of the three EU Member States where more than a third of the population was at risk of poverty or social exclusion in 2017, with a share of 35.7% (Eurostat). Even in this context, it is difficult to question the dominant model of development; the general preoccupation is to assure more economic growth than a sustainable one.

The thematic of Fair Trade is not present on the political agenda of Romanian parties. The participation in this project will help us to develop educational activities, to initiate dialogue with citizens and candidates. We hope to generate new information and motivation among Romanian citizens in order to claim more actions for a sustainable development”, says Mihaela Vețan, president of CRIES –Ressources Center for Ethical and Solidarity based Initiatives.

FRANCE : RTES calls on French candidates for the European Parliament

The Network of Territories for the Solidarity Economy (RTES) launches a call for all candidates, on the basis of the 10 proposals of the RTES for a more united Europe,

In partnership with ESS France and the Le Labo ESS, lunches or breakfasts are organised with European candidates, based on SSE for Europe advocacy proposals from members of ESS France, Social Economy Europe, the ESS Labo and RTES.

RTES will participate in the debate on the questioning of candidates in the European elections organised by Commerce Equitable France, on the 13th of May 2019, on the theme of Inequality and climate change: Which Europe to face these global challenges?

FRANCE : The MES appeals to future MEPs on ten key points

The Mouvement for Solidarity Economy (MES) in France has made an appeal through an Open Letter to European Elections Candidates

SPAIN : REAS proposes a framework of proposals

In view of the series of electoral calls that will take place in the spring of 2019 in the Spanish State, from REAS network of networks, independent organization and composed of 18 sectoral and territorial networks throughout the State, we want to reach political parties, social agents and the general public our framework of proposals for the construction of a more just, democratic and sustainable economy.. 

CATALUNYA : XES launches an SSE campaign in municipalities

GREECE : DOCK launches a Fair Times campaign in Greece

In Greece, through this campaign, we want to inform candidates about the impact of unfair production and consumption policies, not only on a global scale, but also on the interactions with reality in Greece. As the United Nations SDGs demonstrate, social, economic and environmental problems are universal. This universalism requires a concerted commitment to the implementation of coherent policies that can benefit Greek citizens, Europeans and our fellow citizens around the world.

Fair Trade Hellas and Dock are implementing the campaign in Greece. Between now and the European elections, there will be open events, information and education opportunities on the problems of a fair and inclusive economy and on how to defend these problems. In addition, we call on all Members of Parliament to be informed of the issues of the campaign, to join us in discussing how they can also be part of a pan-European campaign that concerns all of us in our country.

On Friday 10 May at 6.30 pm at Impact Hub (Athens), we invite you to a day dedicated to fair trade!

More info:https://dock.zone/anakoinoseis-infopoint/i-panevropaiki-kampania-fair-times-ksekina-stin-ellada/

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