Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Search in comments
Search in excerpt
Search in posts
Search in pages
Search in groups
Search in users
Search in forums
Filter by Categories
Campaign
Editorial
Editorial
Education and Research
Europe
Event
Events
Featured
GA2016-workshops
GA2017
GA2018
General Assembly
International
News
News
Newsletter
Public policies
Public Policies
Resources
State of the Art
Training
Uncategorized
UniverSSE2017
Video
New energies, and a new team in the URGENCI International Committee

Press Release, 12 November 2018

Over 300 URGENCI International Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) network delegates representing over 2 million members from all over the world have just spent three days gathered in Thessaloniki (Greece) for the 7th Urgenci International CSA network meeting, as well as the 4th European gathering and the 2nd Mediterranean Network meeting.

The first day was devoted to three international tracks, covering food justice and solidarity economy, advocacy, and practitioners topics.

These tracks were carried over into the second day which included 30 different workshops on the above, as well as dedicated tracks for the Mediterranean network, Community Supported Fisheries, a beginner’s track, experience sharing, network building, training and social justice. The broad alliances and coalitions that URGENCI has built over several years were echoed in many sessions, as was the need for improved communication on all our many achievements and work.

The rich contents and enthusiasm as well as open-mindedness and respect were all reflected in the third day’s work dedicated to URGENCI’s General Assembly, where a new three-year plan was drawn up. This is also a reflection of the coming of age of URGENCI as a globally recognised social movement and of the increasingly democratic and participatory governance.

The General Assembly also considered how to ensure financial stability through a new membership fee structure that will allow the network to withstand the pressures of potential project shortfalls and financial crises that could result from the current project-based model, and build a new approach was adopted to progressively build collective resilience.

The freshly elected International Committee is a good reflection of URGENCI’s will to continue to grow as an even more inclusive and collective effort. It is a younger and more diverse team than ever before, while still reflecting the producer-consumer as well as gender balance that are also part of Urgenci’s core values. It includes Judith Hitchman (Ireland), and Shi Yan (China) as co-presidents, Isa Alvarez (Spain) as vice-president, and Denis Carel (France), Ariel Molina (Brazil), Qiana Mickie (US), Veikko Heinz (Germany), Simon Todzro (Togo), and Shimpei Murakami (Japan). Zsofia Perenyi (Hungary) was re-elected as Special Expert on Education and Training. The spontaneous creation of a new Special Representative for Community Supported Fisheries is the mirror of the strong enthusiasm and determination to build a sister network under the URGENCI banner on this theme. Community Supported Fisheries are already well developed in North America, and are increasingly recognised in Europe! And Elizabeth Henderson (US) will also continue as URGENCI’s Honorary President.

The new work plan includes specific focus on each continent, with key topics that will develop into new project proposals and actions in the course of the next three years.

All this work was made possible by the dedicated Steering Committee and the local team of AGROECOPOLIS led by Jenny Gkiougki. Many side activities were led, ranging from some very beautiful artwork that consisted of printing postcards to be sent to the FAO, customising t-shirts, and a seed mandala-seed swap. The meeting was also supported by a group of 20 volunteer professional interpreters, and the COATI alternative interpretation systems team, who made the communication possible. They are key actors in all major social movement meetings, and help make our work across borders possible!

Alternatiba 2018: we are the last generation that can save the Planet

By Jason Nardi

Under the pouring rain, the city of Bayonne (in the French Basque country) is nonetheless beautiful and full of life: on Sunday 7th of October the “Alternatives Village” was all over the old town, with hundreds of people in the streets and squares dedicated to many of the existing “alternative” practices – most of them if not all we can say Social Solidarity Economy – that today are not only possible but being done and used by more and more people. Collective Renewable energy solutions, shared mobility (the symbol of Alternatiba is a tandem bicycle – and the bicycle tour that involved thousands of people throughout France, Switzerland and Belgium a success, arriving in Bayonne on the 6th), food agroecological production and collaborative distribution, the Eusko social currency (with both its paper and electronic version) and ethical banking, but also community and cooperative housing, a strong eco-feminist presence (in streets and debates) and a special attention to the migration crisis, brought to us by the current dominant “growth” economy and the climate change that it engenders.

The latter was the main underlying theme of this Festival, started 5 years ago in Bayonne by the citizens group Bizi, full of “normal” and young people, families, and of course activists – who debated together with a rich program (https://alternatiba.eu/2018/10/programme-du-weekend-d-arrivee-du-tour-alternatiba/) as well as cultural and artistic events. While the urgency of a radical, systemic change was clearly perceived by all participants, the convivial and festive atmosphere gave much hope and renewed energy. Saving the Planet is no longer an option – now is the time to engage: “change the system, not the climate”.

Extract from the article Climate: 15,000 people in Bayonne for the release of the IPCC 1.5°C report

More than 15,000 people joined Bayonne this weekend for a major climate campaign. The two days marked by the arrival of the Tour Alternatiba, a gigantic village of alternatives, conferences and an atmosphere of popular emulation ended with a manifesto to initiate the immediate metamorphosis of the territories. Among them, nearly 200 personalities, scientists, political and associative leaders, artists, former ministers. In a duplex from South Korea, Valérie Masson-Delmotte, a member of the IPCC scientific committee, gave the public gathered in Bayonne the first opportunity to adopt the 1.5°C ratio and encouraged the continuation of citizen actions such as the Tour Alternatiba.

On the eve of the release of the IPCC 1.5°C report, Bayonne delivered a strong message. The final manifesto, read by Gaby, a young high school student from Poitiers and Moriba, a young Guinean saved from drowning by a maritime rescue boat while crossing the Mediterranean, both sixteen years old, launched a vibrant appeal for the immediate metamorphosis of our territories.

With nearly 50 conferences (attended by 6263 people) on such fundamental issues as the current government’s climate and energy transition assessment, obstacles to transition, economic relocation, transition financing, transport, renewable energies, solidarity and climate justice, this weekend also contributed to the ongoing discussions. Concrete alternatives such as the 100% renewable electricity supplier Enercoop or the eusko, already Europe’s leading local currency in terms of volume of currency in circulation, which passed the 1 million euskos mark that same weekend, have demonstrated the possibility that alternatives have to change scale.

This civic effervescence in Bayonne reflects what was observed during the 4 months of the Alternatiba Tour, where a total of more than 77,000 people showed their determination to take action to make a real difference. Under the guise of a great popular celebration, Alternatiba 2018 has once again confirmed that the crucial challenge of the fight against climate change is not only a vital challenge that tens of thousands of citizens are ready to take up, but also the foundation for more sustainable and desirable societies.

Text of the Manifesto  (in French) here.

Videos and photos here.

Bilbao: RIPESS at the Global Social Economy Forum GSEF 2018

The Global Social Economy Forum was held in Bilbao (1-3 October 2018). This is the fourth edition after Seoul 2 times and Montreal 2016. It brought together more than 1700 people from 84 countries. It should be noted that a significant number of representatives of local authorities had made the trip to testify to their involvement in the SSE. It is one of the strong points of the GSEF, to link the evolution of the development of cities to the Social Economy. It should be noted in passing that the title “social economy” has largely predominated in the discourse, the term solidarity being considered superfluous in some cultures because it is included. Nevertheless, the term SSE has also been used in several instances, either in plenary or in workshops. This point can and has given rise to some controversy. We know that for RIPESS, the term solidarity is central because it refers to a philosophy of radical contestation of the ultra-liberal model in force in the globalized economy. The title of the Forum, “Values and competitiveness for inclusive and sustainable local development”, strongly advocated by the Bilbao government, was also discussed.

Mondragon, a partner of the event, is an emblematic example of cooperativism, and of the social economy conceived as a systemic complex aiming at autonomy in a context of resistance, at the time of its creation, to Francoism. Mr. Iñigo Ucin, President of the Mondragon County Council, presented his global experience (production, finance, training, distribution) and invited people to field visits.

The workshops on a wide range of themes offered a wide range of experiences, which is always a time to stimulate optimism and an opportunity for meetings that can be extended over time through fruitful collaborations. RIPESS was present with several members from all continents. The opportunity to get in direct contact with representatives of local authorities and the European Commission was well taken.

During a dedicated session, a Declaration on Transformative SSE which aims at real systemic change was read. During the ceremony, people from several cultures and continents read the text in 4 languages.

During the same session, Jason Nardi for RIPESS, Julia Grannel for XES and Carlos Askunze, coordinator of REAS Euskadi, announced the preparation of the World Social Forum on Transformative Economies. A first preparatory phase will take place in April 2019 in Barcelona and the final edition of this Global Forum is scheduled for 2020. The session ended with a “picoteo” (a kind of aperitif dinner) invited by REAS to Hika Ateneo, an alternative place in Bilbao.

In the closing session Margeritte Mendell (Concordia University, Montreal) used an oxymoron to signify that political and also academic research staff should relax the frameworks and rules that stifle the field initiative. She recommended the “institutionalization of flexibility”.

Jason Nardi was one of three people mandated to read the final declaration of the GSEF after participating in its drafting. A statement from the youth who participated in the forum was also presented.

The next edition of the GSEF is expected to take place in Mexico City in 2020.

Post-growth: The EU needs a stability and wellbeing pact, not more growth

Article of The Guardian, September 16, 2018

238 academics call on the European Union and its member states to plan for a post-growth future in which human and ecological wellbeing is prioritised over GDP

This week, scientists, politicians, and policymakers are gathering in Brussels for a landmark conference. The aim of this event, organised by members of the European parliament from five different political groups, alongside trade unions and NGOs, is to explore possibilities for a “post-growth economy” in Europe.

For the past seven decades, GDP growth has stood as the primary economic objective of European nations. But as our economies have grown, so has our negative impact on the environment. We are now exceeding the safe operating space for humanity on this planet, and there is no sign that economic activity is being decoupled from resource use or pollution at anything like the scale required. Today, solving social problems within European nations does not require more growth. It requires a fairer distribution of the income and wealth that we already have.

Growth is also becoming harder to achieve due to declining productivity gains, market saturation, and ecological degradation. If current trends continue, there may be no growth at all in Europe within a decade. Right now the response is to try to fuel growth by issuing more debt, shredding environmental regulations, extending working hours, and cutting social protections. This aggressive pursuit of growth at all costs divides society, creates economic instability, and undermines democracy.

Those in power have not been willing to engage with these issues, at least not until now. The European commission’s Beyond GDP project became GDP and Beyond. The official mantra remains growth — redressed as “sustainable”, “green”, or “inclusive” – but first and foremost, growth. Even the new UN sustainable development goals include the pursuit of economic growth as a policy goal for all countries, despite the fundamental contradiction between growth and sustainability.

The good news is that within civil society and academia, a post-growth movement has been emerging. It goes by different names in different places: décroissance, Postwachstum, steady-state or doughnut economics, prosperity without growth, to name a few. Since 2008, regular degrowth conferences have gathered thousands of participants. A new global initiative, the Wellbeing Economies Alliance (or WE-All), is making connections between these movements, while a European research network has been developing new “ecological macroeconomic models”. Such work suggests that it’s possible to improve quality of life, restore the living world, reduce inequality, and provide meaningful jobs – all without the need for economic growth, provided we enact policies to overcome our current growth dependence.

Some of the changes that have been proposed include limits on resource use, progressive taxation to stem the tide of rising inequality, and a gradual reduction in working time. Resource use could be curbed by introducing a carbon tax, and the revenue could be returned as a dividend for everyone or used to finance social programmes. Introducing both a basic and a maximum income would reduce inequality further, while helping to redistribute care work and reducing the power imbalances that undermine democracy. New technologies could be used to reduce working time and improve quality of life, instead of being used to lay off masses of workers and increase the profits of the privileged few.

Given the risks at stake, it would be irresponsible for politicians and policymakers not to explore possibilities for a post-growth future. The conference happening in Brussels is a promising start, but much stronger commitments are needed. As a group of concerned social and natural scientists representing all Europe, we call on the European Union, its institutions, and member states to:

1. Constitute a special commission on post-growth futures in the EU parliament. This commission should actively debate the future of growth, devise policy alternatives for post-growth futures, and reconsider the pursuit of growth as an overarching policy goal.

2. Incorporate alternative indicators into the macroeconomic framework of the EU and its member states. Economic policies should be evaluated in terms of their impact on human wellbeing, resource use, inequality, and the provision of decent work. These indicators should be given higher priority than GDP in decision-making.

3. Turn the stability and growth pact (SGP) into a stability and wellbeing pact. The SGP is a set of rules aimed at limiting government deficits and national debt. It should be revised to ensure member states meet the basic needs of their citizens, while reducing resource use and waste emissions to a sustainable level.

4. Establish a ministry for economic transition in each member state. A new economy that focuses directly on human and ecological wellbeing could offer a much better future than one that is structurally dependent on economic growth.

​I International Congress in Africa Living Cooperation and Global Citizenship

Campaign for a Global Curriculum of Social Solidarity Economy’s
​I International Congress in Africa
LIVING COOPERATION AND GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP
December 9, 10 and 11, 2018
Kibera (Rowallan Camp, Nairobi), Quênia

COME TOGETHER TO LIVE THE PRINCIPLE OF UBUNTU- “I AM WHAT I AM FOR WHAT WE ALL ARE ” AND BUILD COOPERATION, SUSTAINABILITY AND PEACE STORIES
Let’s meet and connect with social activists from Africa, the Americas and Europe who are developing alternative, sustainable practices to the dominant modes of producing economy, education and culture.

We are calling all those involved in formal, non formal and informal educational processes aiming planetary citizenship and the transformation of reality, with the strengthening of solidarity, non-patriarchal, non-colonial economies, to participate in the Campaign for a Global Curriculum of Social Solidarity Economy’s I International Congress in Africa, LIVING COOPERATION AND GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP. The event, announced at the World Social Forum of Salvador, BR, March 2018, is organized by the Amani Kibera Center for Education for Peace through Deportivo, in Kibera, Nairobi, Quênia and wants to contribute to the realization of the 2030 Agenda- Sustainable Development Goals.
For three days, we will meet citizen initiatives in Kibera, the largest favela of Kenya, where cooperation and solidarity seek to guarantee the rights to housing, food, water, education, sports and peace. We will listen to stories of experiences in education for the solidarity economy and global citizenship, by activists and thinkers from Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda, and countries of the Americas and Europe. We will participate in thematic working groups on the axes of the Conference – Culture of Peace, Sports for Peace, Youth, Women, Ancestral Knowledge, Sustainability and Territories, always in the perspective of the promotion of new solidarity based, cooperative economies. The event – which will be broadcast on the Internet as an Extension Activity of the World Social Forum – will result in an online Magazine that will be published, based on the contributions to this Conference, and in cooperation projects of members of global civil society present, at local, regional and international level (See Program below).
JOIN US AT THE CAMPAIGN FOR A GLOBAL CURRICULUM OF SOCIAL SOLIDARITY ECONOMY’S CONGRESS “LIVING COOPERATION AND GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP”
1-Register as a participant, by sending an email to , containing:
A) your name, e-mail, telephone, organization to which you belong and indicating the modality of participation; face-to-face (will be present in Nairobi) or virtual (via Internet transmission)

OR
2-Register as presenter and submit papers in one or more of the thematic axes of the Conference by sending an e-mail to containing

A) your name, e-mail, telephone, organization to which it belongs and indicating the modality of participation; face-to-face (will be present in Nairobi) or virtual (via Internet transmission)
B) Title of the presentation. Thematic axis (s) addressed: Culture of Peace (), Sports for Peace (), Youth (), Women (), Ancestral Knowledge (), Sustainability () and Territories ()
Type of presentation: Speech ( ) Circle of Conversation ( ) Discussion () Workshop () Other () Which?…….
Time: (15 to 90 m)

Participation in the Conference is free, but they accept collaborations aimed at the reconstruction of the Amani Kibera Center, which was destroyed on July 23 of this year for the construction of a road. https://secure.changa.co.ke/myweb/share/24630

Those who register will receive information about lodging in Nairobi.
If you need a Letter from the Organizers requesting support for the expenses with the trip, this will be provided.
PROGRAM
Day 1 – Opening – the participants; Visit to the transformative initiatives in Kibera; Night of art and culture
Day 2- Presentations of activists and thinkers from Africa, Americas and Europe. Presentations (working groups) on the topics of the Conference
Day 3 – Plenary on the papers presented. Proposals for joint projects of Education for the social solidarity Economy and Global Citizenship, towards the realization of the 2030 Agenda-SDG. Night of art and culture
Consultas: internationalcongresscampaign@gmail.com

If cooperatives were the future of the press?
Abstract of the article (in French) :Et si les coopératives étaient l’avenir de la presse ?, by Pauline Porro, Ina Global, August 30, 2018

Crédit :
Ina. Illustration  Martin Vidberg

The press is in crisis and is trying to reinvent its economic model. The article provides an overview of the media companies in France that have opted for the cooperative status.

Among the 35,047 press cards awarded in France in 2017, 32 would be press companies, 6 in Scic (cooperative society of collective interest) and 26 in Scop (participative cooperative society) (including news agencies and publishing of newspapers, periodicals and magazines), ie 228 employees.

In view of their operation, which is based on the pooling of information collection means, especially internationally, the cooperative is a status particularly suited to news agencies. Thus, the Associated Press has a cooperative status, like the German agency Deutsche Presse-Agentur, or Reuters until its IPO in 1984. But in contrast to news agencies, where the choice of cooperative status is justified by a certain economic rationality, the choice of this status for an out-of-agency media is more a matter of compliance with values, notably that of the SSE. But it can also be the fruit of history: indeed, at the end of the Second World War, the cooperatives or the Sapo (public limited company with worker participation) are numerous within the press resulting from the Resistance.

Cooperative status has concrete repercussions on the one hand,
– the strong involvement of the staff that find themselves both employees and owners of capital;
– explains the resilience of these companies, which are often higher than the national average, showing an accumulation of reserves in good years and prudent management, uncontaminated by the search for profit at all costs;
– the safeguard of jobs in situations where so-called traditional firms resort to redundancies.

However, when heavy investments are needed – the digital transition for example – the cooperative model can become a weakness, especially in such a competitive environment. In addition, it also causes difficulties raised by the set up, the formalism and the delays to settle which can be dissuasive to carry out such a project. Approaches of other statutes are currently being explored to guarantee employees a place in the governance bodies, ensure editorial independence while sharing the philosophy of a cooperative society.

RIPESS at the WSF2018
FSM / WSF 2018

The World Social Forum 2018, will be held from March 13 to 17, 2018, in Salvador de Bahia, Brazil, where several members of RIPESS LAC will be attending, as well as members from RIPESS Europe and XES, who will be presenting the Thematic Social Forum on Economies of Change, which is planned to be held in Barcelona in 2019.

The World Social Forum (WSF), which began in Brazil, is one of the largest gatheringswhere civil society experiences are shared and solutions are agreed on solutions, in terms of solidarity and democratic perspectives. The event brings together tens of thousands of participants from around the world, who will be debating various topics, from social development, to the solidarity economy, the environment, human rights and democratization, among other themes.

The slogan of the WSF 2018 is “Resist is to Create, Resist is to Transform” and it points to the need for alternatives for another possible world.

As mentioned in the forum application letter, strong resistance movements are once again emerging in Brazil due to the Neo-liberal reforms being implemented in the country. This context will be sure to generate opportunities for cooperation between the alternatives that already exist both there and in the world.

RIPESS LAC, the RIPESS network of Social Solidarity Economy of Latin America and the Caribbean seek to consolidate alliances and facilitate the convergence of alternative practices at a continental level.

We invite you to join the conference: The Solidarity Economy Movement in Latin America and the Caribbean: cooperate in the network! (on 15 March from 9.am- UFBA – Faculdade de Comunicação – Room 3), in which several members of RIPESS LAC will be present: Luciano Mina and Rosemary Gomez (from the Brazilian Forum of Solid Economics – FBES) and Alicia Canaviri Mallcu (The Solidarity Economy and Fair Trade Movement of Bolivia). To contact RIPESS LAC write to: americalatinacaribe@ripess.org

The event will also be an occasion to present the project for the Thematic Social Forum on Economies of Change, which is currently being promoted by RIPESS Europe, the XES(the Catalan Social and Solidarity Economy Network) and RIPESS Intercontinental, and which is planned to take place in Barcelona, Spain, in April 2019.

Besides bringing together networks of public authorities, universities and social movements, this forum aims at strengthening alliances and strategic actions in the whole range of today’s transformative alternatives (SSE, the commons economy, feminist economy, collaborative economy, fair trade, ethical finances, degrowth, food sovereignty, etc.), by focusing on creating practical solutions for a resilient, co-operative and solidarity-based society.

You are invited to participate in the construction of this forum, contributing with your experience and skills. You can contact the organizing team at: forum2019@ripess.org; and for those who will be at the forum, to also attend the presentation event (on March 15 from 1.pm – UFBA – Faculdade de Farmácia – room 1)) where Jason Nardi and Josette Combes from RIPESS Europe will be present, as well as Fernando Paniagua from XES.

Finally, RIPESS has been invited to participate in several conferences, among which are (dates to be confirmed – See the final programme):

 

We hope to see you at WSF 2018!

“Europe and SSE – the time has come!” (January 12, 2018) in Lille

With nearly 170 participants and high density debates, the conference “Europe and SSE, the time has come!” organised by RTES and REVES was a success and a strong impulse to follow up the committed work.

A dense morning allowed to draw the landscape of the question of social and solidarity economy at a European level. The presentation of a mapping to highlight the different SSE approaches in the Union countries, the presentation of a report from the experts group with the European Commission, the testimonies of the local authorities committed in social and solidarity economy projects with a European dimension or financing, the presentation of the position of RIPESS Europe on the co-construction of public policies (see here) and finally the strong words of experts on these questions and of the Commission representative, Ulla Engelmann and of European MEP, Marie-Christine Vergiat, allowed to tackle the issues around this thematic.

The complete article is available in French here.

Finland: “Local and Decentralised” Pixelache 2017
October 5, 2017
0

[by Ruby Van der Wekken]
Commons.fi and visiting RIPESS coordination team participated at the Pixelache 2017 Local and Decentralised Festival. For Commons.fi already having the intention to participate the Pixelache Festival, the possibility to have the RIPESS team over was a great opportunity to share on all and strengthen own objectives. Read more

9th ILO SSE Academy in Luxemburg: the Future of Work
ILO Academy Sep 2017 Luxembourg

The 9th ILO SSE Academy took place in Luxembourg city in the last week of September 2017. Echoing the ILO ILO Declaration on Social Justice for a Fair Globalization (2008), the 9th SSE Academy was centered on the future of work, exploring a diverse set of themes such as the digitalization of work, the circular economy, the creation of decent work for refugees, among others.

The recent ILO report “SSE and the Future of Work” was presented, you can download a copy (pdf EN) here.

As RIPESS Europe was represented during this Academy, we had a chance to connect and share with participating representant of governments, local, regional and national policymakers, SSE actors and members of civil society through different workshops, study visits and informal exchanges.

Watch the video (in French): Laura Aufrère (RIPESS Europe) talks about SSE and the Future of Work

Other videos and documentation can be found in the “Collective Brain” website.

Skip to toolbar